Select Page

А Б В Г Д Е Ж З И К Л М Н О П Р С Т У Ф Х Ц Ч Ш Щ Э Ю Я
Generic selectors
Exact matches only
Search in title
Search in content
Search in posts
Search in pages
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z | 0-9

автор сайта:

Николай Куприков

рок-музыкант, видеоблогер

Wellerman

chords for piano, guitar & ukulele

Folk songs

G

Greensleeves

W

Wellerman
    				    		Am

[Verse 1]

     Am
There once was a ship that put to sea
               Dm                                       Am
And the name of the ship was the Billy of Tea
         Am
The winds blew hard, her bow dipped down
        E                                 Am
O blow, my bully boys, blow

Chorus:
F                          C
Soon may the Wellerman come
      Dm                           Am
To bring us sugar and tea and rum
F                                  C
One day, when the tonguin’ is done,
           E                             Am
We’ll take our leave and go

[Verse 2]

       Am
She had not been two weeks from shore
            Dm                   Am
When down on her a right whale bore
       Am
The captain called all hands and swore
           E                             Am
He'd take that whale in tow

Chorus:
F                          C
Soon may the Wellerman come
      Dm                           Am
To bring us sugar and tea and rum
F                                  C
One day, when the tonguin’ is done,
           E                             Am
We’ll take our leave and go

[Verse 3]

    Am
Before the boat had hit the water
             Dm                  Am
The whale's tail came up and caught her
      Am
All hands to the side, harpooned and fought her
             E                            Am
When she dived down below

Chorus:
F                          C
Soon may the Wellerman come
      Dm                           Am
To bring us sugar and tea and rum
F                                  C
One day, when the tonguin’ is done,
           E                             Am
We’ll take our leave and go

[Verse 4]

     Am
No line was cut, no whale was freed;
        Dm                              Am
The Captain's mind was not of greed
      Am
But he belonged to the whaleman's creed;
         E                         Am
She took the ship in tow

Chorus:
F                          C
Soon may the Wellerman come
      Dm                           Am
To bring us sugar and tea and rum
F                                  C
One day, when the tonguin’ is done,
           E                             Am
We’ll take our leave and go

[Verse 5]

       Am
For forty days, or even more
       Dm                               Am
The line went slack, then tight once more
      Am
All boats were lost (there were only four)
          E                             Am
But still that whale did go

Chorus:
F                          C
Soon may the Wellerman come
      Dm                           Am
To bring us sugar and tea and rum
F                                  C
One day, when the tonguin’ is done,
           E                             Am
We’ll take our leave and go

[Verse 6]

    Am
As far as I've heard, the fight's still on;
      Dm                                    Am
The line's not cut and the whale's not gone
         Am
The Wellerman makes his regular call
           Dm                               Am
To encourage the Captain, crew, and all

Chorus:
F                          C
Soon may the Wellerman come
      Dm                           Am
To bring us sugar and tea and rum
F                                  C
One day, when the tonguin’ is done,
           E                             Am
We’ll take our leave and go.    				    	

The song is believed to have been written in New Zealand around 1860–1870.[3] While its authorship is unknown, it may have been written by a teenage sailor or shore whaler[9] and may have served as a “cutting-in shanty” that whalers would sing as they slaughtered a whale.[10] It was originally collected around 1966 by New Zealand-based music teacher and folk song compiler Neil Colquhoun[11] from one F. R. Woods. Woods, who was in his 80s at the time, had allegedly heard the song, as well as the song “John Smith A.B.”, from his uncle. The song “John Smith A.B.” was printed in a 1904 issue of The Bulletin, where it was attributed to one D.H. Rogers. It is possible that Rogers was the uncle of Woods and that Rogers had worked as a teenaged sailor or shore whaler in the early-mid 19th century, composing both songs in his later years and eventually passing them on to his nephew as an old man.[1] In 1973, “Soon May the Wellerman Come” was included in Colquhoun’s book of New Zealand folk songs, New Zealand Folksongs: Songs of a Young Country.

Share This